The importance of keeping dead wood in your bushland

Keeping fallen trees, branches and debris in your bushland or on your property is important for many animals. Fallen trees in particular that have a hollow are utilised by many types of animals such as insects, reptiles, mammals and birds. They provide shelter or a home for many species as well as nesting sites, and they can provide food for a variety of insects and fungi.

Leaving fallen trees and debris (often refered to as ‘litter’) is vital to supply nutrients to the soil, to retain moisture in the soil, to provide insulation to the soil in our summer time and to reduce soil erosion. Leaving litter on the ground also assists with the growth of new seedlings that occur as a result of natural regeneration.

Dead trees that are still standing, and which may still be standing in 50 years time, can also provide vital habitat to wildlife and are a valuable feature of any bushland. So, instead of cleaning up your property to burn or get rid of dead standing trees, fallen logs, trees and debris, have a think about all the animals that you could potentially benefit from leaving them in situ!

Below are some photos of various animals including a black gloved wallaby, chuditch, brushtail possum, dunnart, echidna, monitor lizard, woylie, and a rufous treecreeper (bird) utilising the same hollow!

Photos taken from data generated on Western Shield Camera Watch project via the Zooniverse.org platform, development of which is funded by generous support, including a Global Impact Award from Google, and by a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Black-gloved wallaby. Photo credit: DBCA district monitoring.

Chuditch. Photo credit: DBCA district monitoring.

Dunnart (to left of hollow opening). Photo credit: DBCA district monitoring.

Echidna. Photo credit: DBCA district monitoring.

Monitor lizard. Photo credit: DBCA district monitoring.

Numbat (on right side of log). Photo credit: DBCA district monitoring.

Brushtail possum. Photo credit: DBCA district monitoring.

Rufous tree creeper. Photo credit: DBCA district monitoring.

Woylie. Photo credit: DBCA district monitoring.

 

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